How To Remove MBA Law Offices/CAPIO from Your Credit Report


If MBA Law Offices/Capio is calling you and sending letters claiming you owe them money, they’ve likely reported your debt to one or more of the credit bureaus.

When that happens, your credit could suffer for as long as seven years, regardless of whether you pay your debt off or not.

Fortunately, there are a few strategies you can use to get a collections agency like MBA off your report and improve your credit score.

What Is MBA Law Offices/Capio?

MBA Law Offices isn’t a name you’ve likely encountered outside of your credit report, but they are a legitimate company.

Short for Mitchell D. Bluhm and Associates, the small debt collection agency/law firm is located in Texas and collects medical debts across the country.

You can reach MBA Law at the following mailing address:

Mitchell D. Bluhm & Associates, LLC
3400 Texoma Pkwy STE 100
Sherman, TX 75090-1916

The company is affiliated with Capio Partners, another collections agency, so you may see an entry referencing both agencies on your report.

How Does MBA Law Offices/Capio Work?

Sometimes, debt collectors are employed by businesses to call, send letters, and process payments from customers with late payments.

Other times, collection agencies buy your debt outright from the company you owe. Regardless, once your debt reaches a collections agency, they’ll report your delinquency to the credit bureaus.

A collections entry will be added to your report, where it stays for seven years.

Unless you get MBA Law to consent to have the entry deleted, it will remain on your report even if you pay them what you owe. We’ll show you how to get the agency to delete your entry below.

MBA’s collections entry might only drop your score a few points, but depending on the balance on your account, the number of negative entries, and other factors, it could have a more detrimental effect on your score.

You can also expect letters and phone calls from the agency until you make a payment.

3 Ways to Get MBA Law Offices/Capio Removed from Your Credit Report

Now that you understand who MBA Law Offices/Capio is and how they work, here are a few tips to get the collections agency off your credit report.

1. Get Proof of the Debt

The FDCPA gives you one month to dispute a collections entry on your credit report.

That means you have 30 days to mail MBA Law a debt validation letter.

If you submit this letter in that timeframe, the agency is required by law to provide evidence of the debt.

This could include important details about your original lender or provider, your account number, and dates surrounding your account.

If the agency has that information on hand, they can legally continue to pursue payments from you.

If not, they’ll have to stop trying to collect and right the situation with the credit bureaus.

Individuals who’ve been targeted due to faulty reporting should absolutely start out with debt validation, but so should people who actually owe MBA Law money.

As a third-party debt collector, MBA might not have the info it needs to validate your debt. That means your debt could be forgiven without you having to pay it.

All you have to do is mail in a letter.

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2. Pay to Have It Deleted

Debt validation doesn’t always work as planned.

If you miss the deadline for sending a debt validation letter or MBA has the proof it needs, you’ll have to try another strategy to get the entry removed from your report.

Instead of just paying the agency what you owe, we recommend that you negotiate a pay-for-delete agreement.

In this scenario, you pay an agreed-upon amount of your debt in exchange for its immediate removal from your report.

Otherwise, the collections entry will stay on your credit report for seven years.

Since debt collectors buy debts at a low rate, they’re probably willing to negotiate a lower amount.

That means you could get the collections entry deleted while only paying a portion of what you owe.

Just be sure that you negotiate with MBA in writing. Then, your agreement will be thoroughly documented if you have any problems getting the entry deleted.

The credit bureaus should be promptly updated to reflect your payment.

If the entry is still on your report for more than a month after you make a payment, you should follow up with the agency and the bureaus.

3. Use a Credit Repair Service

If you aren’t fond of the idea of contacting a collections agency directly to dispute your debt or negotiate payments, there is an alternative.

A credit repair company can help to get the agency off your credit report easily, minimizing the inconvenience to you.

Realistically, a single collections entry won’t significantly lower your score, but combined with other factors, it can do major damage.

Credit repair companies are experts at tackling credit issues big and small. Wherever your credit score is, they can craft a tailor-made plan to take it to the next level.

Whether you’re merely trying to settle up with debt collectors or you have more serious issues like bankruptcy, judgments, or liens, credit repair services can be well worth the expense.

You might want to start by exploring our list of the best credit repair companies to see what each one has to offer.

Whether you’re searching for help or want to try your hand at getting MBA Law off your report on your own, don’t delay another day.

Take the knowledge above and start working to improve your score now. Your future self will be grateful.

Dealing with MBA Law Offices/Capio

When it comes to dealing with debt collectors, it’s important to understand the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act.

The FDCPA is there to keep debt collectors from harassing you and to ensure accurate reporting. This is important, because like other debt collectors, MBA Law Offices/Capio receives complaints about its interactions with customers.

You can get an idea of consumers’ experiences with collection agencies by taking a look at their Better Business Bureau and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau profiles.

Below are a few of the key provisions of the FDCPA:

  • Debt collectors cannot threaten you or be abusive.
  • Agencies may only call you from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • They are prohibited from disclosing info about your debt to other people.
  • Upon request, debt collectors will not contact you while you’re at work.
  • You have the right to only communicate with debt collectors in writing.

You should always choose to communicate by mail with debt collectors.

Not only does it stop their repetitive phone calls, but it can provide you with vital documentation that could help you get your debt removed.



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